Tag: Georgia Patrikios

From young admirer to footballer: Patrikios lives out her dream

CALDER Cannons star, Georgia Patrikios was simply following in her brother’s footsteps as a youngster.

Now, she is one of Calder’s key players, a multiple Vic Metro representative and a member of the AFL Women’s Academy. Patrikios admits she cannot believe that young admirer of football is now a player herself.

“Ever since I saw my brother step onto the field, it’s sort of been a dream of mine to do what he does,” she said. “Now, it’s become a reality.”

Part of the reality has included being selected to travel to the Gold Coast for this year’s AFL Women’s Under 18 Championships back in July. Although she’s pulled on the ‘Big V’ before, the 17 year-old is still honoured to do it again.

“It’s pretty special to me, playing with the best girls at Cannons and playing with the best girls in Victoria,” Patrikios said. “I’m glad I got the opportunity to do so.”

This has been largely thanks to her development at the Cannons. Playing under the likes of top-agers, Madison Prespakis, Carla Rendelmann and Molly Warburton has really helped Patrikios develop her game.

“Being a bottom-ager, playing with the older girls, it’s been real good learning off them,” she said. “The coaches and the facilities are also amazing.”

Out of this development, Patrikios has developed some clear strengths.

“I’d probably say maybe my speed and agility, they’re probably my best assets,” she said.

Being eligible for next year’s draft, Patrikios has a year to finesse her skills, noting an improvement she’d like to make in her game.

“I’d probably say my overhead mark and probably my one-on-one contest, just getting my body a bit stronger and a be able to win those one-one contests,” the 17 year-old said.

Now with some time off football, Patrikios will get away, but she will not exactly relax.

“I like to go away so I do a lot of work at my beach house, a lot of running, go to the gym with my brother, kick the footy with them,” she said.

This work will undoubtedly help Patrikios play a big part in the Cannons’ 2019 season, and help her relive her favourite football memory, which was lifting up the premiership cup with her Calder teammates. She admits this year was a tough one to endure, but it started to come together towards the back half of the season.

“It’s just how it goes, the older girls move up, the younger girls just have to step up,” the Vic Metro representative said. “I had a pretty interrupted pre-season. “I found the start of my season a bit shaky but then coming to the last few weeks of the season, I put a few good games together.”

Despite the TAC Cup Girls season being over, Patrikios still went back to her local club, Pascoe Vale in a bid to turn a couple of good games into a solid season.

“I’ve gone back to local club, just working on my skills there and a bit of fitness,” she said. “Then we go back to the Cannons every second week and just do some training, fix up what we need to.”

The Pascoe Vale Football Club has played a big part in Patrikios’ football development, making the transition from boys football at West Coburg to female football seamless. Now approaching her top-age year of football, Patrikios hopes to combine her career choice of being a personal trainer with football.

“I’m hoping to maybe do a course after school after Year 12, so that would be good,” she said. “But I’ll probably hone down on going to the gym, getting my body right and just working on those basic skills.”

Future is bright for women’s football

IF anyone ever had any doubts about the future of AFL Women’s, then they need look no further than this week’s V/Line Cup. The best 14-16 year-olds from across regional and rural Victoria tackled each other in Gippsland in the annual tournament held at Moe, Morwell and Traralgon. Walking away from the event, I was blown away by the quality of the competitors, not just in terms of skill development, but in terms of game smarts and decision making.

Put it down to coaching, natural development or other factors, the women’s game is growing, fast. Having watched the inaugural TAC Cup Girls competition in 2017, you had your absolute standouts like Chloe Molloy and Monique Conti tearing it up for Calder Cannons, and everyone had been talking about Isabel Huntington for years. Then there were the next group of talented players that made their way onto AFL Women’s lists such as Maddy Guerin, Sarah Dargan, Iilish Ross, Bridie Kennedy and Georgia Gee, plus others.

Fast forward 12 months, and attending the TAC Cup Girls competition in 2018, I attended 26 matches in the nine round season, and instead of having two or three unbelievable players, that had grown into double figures – that is, of players who could seriously impact at senior level almost immediately. Geelong Falcons duo Nina Morrison and Olivia Purcell were outstanding against their peers, and had no troubles finding the ball at higher levels. Mikala Cann is a perfect example of how players from other sports can adapt in such a short amount of time, while Emerson Woods joined Cann as a premiership player at senior level.

Even at the AFL Women’s Under 18 Championships, having witnessed all the games on the Gold Coast, you saw those players who had starred at TAC Cup Girls level, go up to face the best players from across the country. Talents like Alyce Parker, McKenzie Dowrick, Nikki Gore, Nat Grider, and Chloe and Libby Haines showed why they had been held in such high regard in their respective states. All of the above earned invites to the National Draft Combine.

But what was just as pleasing at those championships, was the development of the bottom-age players who shone through. It is hard to believe the likes of Georgia Patrikios, Gabby Newton, Lucy McEvoy, Lily Postlethwaite, Montana McKinnon, Mia King and Mikayla Bowen should all be running around on the Gold Coast for their respective states again next year. Remarkably, the 2020 draft crop already has names that are worthy of representing their state, as Abbey Dowrick, Abbie Ballard, Netty Garlo and Zimmorlei Farquharson were among those double bottom-agers who still matched it with more experienced players. Add in the likes of Ellie McKenzie, Isabelle Pritchard, Renee Saulitis and Tyanna Smith who were all impressive for the Victorian Under 16s outfits, and the foundations for the future are certainly there. An extra element will be the possible father-daughter selections, with Abbie McKay (Carlton) being the first possible case study this year, while Tarni Brown (Collingwood) and Alice Burke (St Kilda) loom as two more.

While we will go into more detail about the V/Line Cup recap next week, the overall standard of the competition was arguably equal to or even better than the 2017 TAC Cup competition. Or in other words, the players are two to three years more advanced than their predecessors. In the Geelong Falcons game against Bendigo Pioneers, there were two players that were worth highlighting even early on in the game. In one instance, a player was against two opponents just inside 50 and the easiest option would have been to bring the ball out and cause a forward stoppage. Instead, she tapped the ball in front of her, not taking possession, but maintaining speed, and kept dribbling it ahead of her pursuing opponents, then without even taking possession, managed to kick it off the ground into the goal square, where a teammate soccered it through.

The second example was even better, and exemplified the game sense that players have developed over time. A player had the ball tight against the boundary line under pressure not far from the behind post. In year’s gone by, regardless of competition, most young players, especially at the age where goals are usually the only statistical measure you can brag about to your mates on the league website, would blaze away and go for the miracle snap. With so many opposition players inside 50, it would have been the easy option, and no-one would have blamed her for doing so. Instead, she calmly assessed her options and spotted a teammate amongst the chaos about 25m out, sending a nice kick to her advantage, setting up an easy shot on goal. Without being their live, you do not see these things, but it is little moments like that, which make all the difference.

Another example, just to show it was not just one game, was on the second day when a Western Bulldogs Next Generation Academy (GWV Rebels region) player won the ball at half-back. She won the ball in defence, had an opponent chasing her from a 45-degree angle to close her down, and backed her speed to take her on and get around her. She did just that, but looking ahead, the opposition had blocked up the easiest option along the wing. She would have to kick long to a contest, probably outnumbered. Instead she briefly glanced inside and in one of the toughest kicks to do, managed to hit that kick around her body to the defensive 50 where a teammate marked, and not only was it an effective kick, but it opened up the corridor, and the game, with the opponents already set in running towards the wing.

Aside from the few examples, there was more contested marking, more protecting of ball drops and ground balls, more fend-offs, more deft taps to teammates. Areas in which players generally do not always think of as first options. But the past week, it was happening more and more. There is no doubt there has been some serious critics of women’s football, and no doubt that will continue, but if you can stop and look hard enough, you do not have to look too far to see the game is blossoming, and I for one, am excited for what 2019 and beyond holds.

2018 AFL Women’s Under 18 All Australians – Profiled

IT has been a stellar year of Under-18 female football across the country and it showed on Friday night when the best of the best went head-to-head at the Adelaide Oval. From the Victoria vs. All Stars clash, the initial All Australian squad of 48 was reduced to a team of 24. We describe the attributes of each player which led them to being an All Australian.

 

BACK LINE:

Serene Watson – Queensland

A member of the Gold Coast Suns Academy, Watson is an impressive player who is composed under pressure. She has strong hands in the contest and can find the ball in space. Despite not being the biggest-bodied player, Watson is able to excite with her run and carry across the defensive 50, where she was able to get her Queensland side out of trouble many times during the AFL Women’s Under 18 Championships.

Lucy Cripps – Vic Country

One of the most consistent players for the Dandenong Stingrays in the TAC Cup Girls competition, Lucy Cripps rarely missed a beat during the season. She continued her good form into the Under 18 Championships, often playing a good lock-down role on some of the star forwards from the other states. She could run the ball out of defence in a flash and was pivotal in Vic Country’s success during the tournament.

Natalie Grider – Queensland

The Queensland captain and Most Valuable Player (MVP) was very unlikely to miss the final cut of the All Australian squad after a sensational Under 18 Championships. Grider had strong hands in defence and her endurance was impressive as she was able to move up and down the ground with ease. Grider’s tackling is also a feature in her game, as it often saved crucial forward thrusts from opposition teams.

 

HALF BACKS:

Jordyn Allen – Vic Country

One of the best on-field leaders, Allen never disappointed during the TAC Cup Girls competition. She was an intercept marking machine, creating a wall of her own across half-back multiple times. She continued to do this in the AFL Women’s Under 18 Championships, and complemented her marking with great run and carry and tackling. Allen is also a versatile player who can head into the midfield when required, where she able to have the same damaging influence.

McKenzie Dowrick – Western Australia

Dowrick is one of the most talented West Australian (WA) Under 18 players and is no stranger to making the All Australian team. A member of the AFL Women’s Academy, Dowrick has been able to show what she has learnt from the academy with slick skills and smart ball-use. She is a clever left-footer who can kick precisely to hit any target, and like Allen, can make an impact in any position. Dowrick’s footy smarts are elite as she is able to read the play and execute the one percenters to get the ball forward for her side.

Sabreena Duffy – Western Australia

Like Grider, Sabreena Duffy was unlikely to miss the final All Australian cut due to her great performance as WA captain during the AFL Women’s Under 18 Championships. She was named WA’s MVP of the tournament due to being a rock in defence. Duffy’s hands were solid as she was able to mark the ball well and give off quick handballs to running teammates, opening up the game for her side. She was one that her team relied on, as she would often kick the ball out of full-back and steady the ship for her side with her precise kicking. This is Duffy’s fifth All Australian jumper in what has been an amazing career for her in Under 18s football.

 

CENTRE LINE:

Georgia Patrikios – Vic Metro

Another player who can make an impact in any position, the All Australian selectors could have put Patrikios in any position on the field. During her time at the Calder Cannons, Patrikios played mostly in the forward line and creates excitement when combining her great run and carry with her elite agility. During the AFL Women’s Under 18 Championships, she often floated back into defence where she was able to use her quick hands and accurate kicking to get the ball forward for Metro. The AFL Women’s Academy member arguably does her best work on the wing though and the selectors have recognised that. This is due to her outside speed and long kicks creating forward momentum for her team.

Madison Prespakis – Vic Metro

What a year it has been for Madison Prespakis. She was awarded the Calder Cannons’ captaincy, won the Best and Fairest for her club, was named MVP for Vic Metro in the AFL Women’s Under 18 Championships, as well as joint MVP of the tournament, and she now has an All Australian spot under her belt. It’s hard to fault Prespakis’ year as she has dominated across all competitions with her high footy IQ. Her kicks are booming, her hands are clean and swift and her tackling is ferocious. She is also an accurate kick for goal, and often made an impact up forward both for the Cannons and Vic Metro. In her last Under 18 game, she racked up 21 disposals, five clearances and four inside 50s to cap off an unbelievable year. She was also the joint TAC Cup Girls best and fairest.

Nina Morrison – Vic Country

Nina Morrison can be talked about on the same level as Prespakis, as she too was the joint MVP of the AFL Women’s Under 18 Championships and was named as the MVP of Vic Country. Morrison has made the wing her own during the TAC Cup Girls season, providing blistering speed and aggressive tackling to stop any player in their tracks. Her football smarts allowed her to use quick hands and long kicks to get the ball forward for her side. She is an exciting player to watch and is one of the most promising draft prospects this year. She was also the joint TAC Cup Girls best and fairest.

 

HALF FORWARDS:

Sophie Van De Heuvel – Vic Country

A cricketer, an AFL Women’s Academy member, a Vic Country representative and now an All Australian – Sophie Van De Heuvel’s year has been a solid one. Van De Heuvel played a great role up forward for the Greater Western Victoria (GWV) Rebels this season, taking some strong marks and kicking six goals from seven games. Her role was more dynamic in the Under 18 Championships as she was able to rack up plenty of the football as well as get the goals on the board. She was named in the best in all three matches on the Gold Coast, highlighting her consistency in the ‘Big V’.

Gabrielle Newton – Vic Metro

She is only 17, but Gabrielle Newton is already tearing the TAC Cup Girls competition to shreds. Newton is a versatile player who does her best work in the midfield, but finds herself up forward on plenty of occasions. She has one of the cleanest sets of hands in the TAC Cup Girls competition and when she’s on, she is one of the most influential players as she can turn the game on its head. She was one of Vic Metro’s most consistent players across the Under 18 Championships as she consistently racked up high disposals and complemented this with goals, making her an exciting prospect next year.

Belle Dawes – Queensland

Dawes is an exciting forward who provides plenty of X-factor with the ball in hand. She applied sensational forward pressure during the AFL Women’s Under 18 Championships, highlighted by her strong tackling. She’s a player that loves to get amongst the goals and is a versatile mover inside 50. Dawes is a member of the AFL Women’s Academy as well as the Brisbane Lions Academy, and is eligible for the draft next year, meaning she will be able to go to Brisbane or the Gold Coast Suns if she elects to stay in Queensland. She also became a premiership player for Wilston Grange, playing a key role through the midfield.

 

FORWARDS:

Daisy Bateman – Vic Metro

If there’s a game with Daisy Bateman in it, you can almost be certain that she will kick a goal. She kicked 14 goals from seven games in the TAC Cup Girls season this year and five goals from four games in the AFL Women’s Under 18 Championships. She has also been kicking goals with Collingwood’s Victorian Football League (VFL) Women’s team, showing that she has been able to match it up against the bigger bodies. Bateman is a great mark of the footy and is a great leading target. She can also crumb the footy off the back of the pack, sneaking in plenty of goals to make her one of the most dangerous draft-eligible forwards.

Lucy McEvoy – Vic Country

Lucy McEvoy played as a defender in the TAC Cup Girls competition, but led the way in goals during the AFL Women’s Under 18 Championships. The Geelong premiership captain ended up with nine goals from four games, including a five-goal haul to kick-start her Gold Coast tournament. McEvoy is known for her strong hands and smart kicking under pressure. She can also bring her teammates into the game with quick hands, making herself known as a great team player. At just 17 years-old, McEvoy captained the Falcons to a premiership this year and still has one more year to show what she is made of before she is eligible to be drafted.

Montana McKinnon – South Australia

A well-deserved addition in the side, McKinnon was extremely impressive during the AFL Women’s Under 18 Championships. She had arguably the best hands in the tournament, marking everything that came her way. McKinnon could make an impact at either end of the ground and also worked hard in the ruck when needed. She is a player with a high footy IQ, as her kicks and smooth hands are second to none. Her tackling pressure was also high throughout the tournament and as a result of all these attributes, she backed up her MVP award with an All Australian spot.

 

FOLLOWERS:

Lauren Bella – Queensland

It is no surprise to see Lauren Bella in the All Australian ruck position, as she carried the load in style for Queensland. She gave her midfielders prime use of the football with her clever taps and she also was able to rove her own ball, giving off quick hands to running teammates. Bella is a member of the AFL Women’s Academy and the Gold Coast Suns Academy. She also made the 2017 Under 18 AFL Women’s All Australian team, highlighting her consistency in the ruck position.

Alyce Parker – NSW/ACT

A proficient ball-winner and a bonafide star, it is hard to look past Alyce Parker when watching her play. She is an inside brute, as she is able to extract the ball out of tight contests and boot it out of trouble, opening up the ground for her teammates. She also provides great run and carry with the ball in hand and can float up forward to get some goals on the board too. She was named as NSW/ACT’s MVP after the AFL Women’s Under 18 Championships and backed up her All Australian appearance last year with another spot this year. Parker is also a member of the AFL Women’s Academy and she has most recently become a premiership player at her local club, Thurgoona. She was named best on ground in the Grand Final and kicked 18 goals from her six games.

Tyla Hanks – Vic Country

Hanks was the dominant player for the Gippsland Power this year, with the co-captain being named in the best in every game she played this year. A member of the AFL Women’s Academy and a 2017 All Australian, Hanks has now backed up her good form in the perfect way with another All Australian jumper. She is a class above with her clean hands and long kicks, which was a huge reason why the Power experienced plenty of success this season. Her tackling pressure is immense and she can also float up forward to put some scores on the board, showing how versatile she is.

 

INTERCHANGE:

Jacqueline Yorston – Queensland

Jacqueline Yorston impressed in the Under 18 Championships with her precise kicking and tackling pressure. Her hands were also clean on the inside and she was able to extract the ball out of tight contests and create space with her run and carry. She also can match it up with the bigger bodies, playing with Wilston Grange in the Queensland Women’s Australian Football League (QWAFL) and enjoying a premiership alongside fellow Queensland All Australian Belle Dawes.

Lily Postlethwaite – Queensland

Lily Postlethwaite could have also received the MVP award for Queensland at the end of the AFL Women’s Championships, as she was named as best-on-ground in each of the three matches at Gold Coast. Her run and carry in the midfield was exquisite as she was able to clear the ball out of congestion and break away from opponents. Her clean hands and accurate kicks were also a highlight of her game and were pivotal in Queensland’s success in the AFL Women’s Under 18 Championships. Postlethwaite is just 17 and a member of the AFL Women’s Academy, making her eligible for next year’s draft.

Olivia Purcell – Vic Country

The Geelong premiership player is a midfield star who knows how to continually rack up the possessions. She was one of the strongest tacklers in the TAC Cup Girls competition, running down opponents with ease and aggression. Her hands on the inside were elite and her kicks allows teammates to find space. Purcell is also a great clearance player and can get the ball out of trouble for her side. She has most recently won the Geelong Falcons’ top award, being named the Best and Fairest.

Eleanor Brown – Vic Metro

Rounding out the side is Sandringham’s Eleanor Brown, who has been a revelation for the Dragons this season. Brown’s run and carry in the midfield has been elite and her kicks were long and created plenty of space. Her quick hands made an impact on both the inside and the outside and she loved to use the space she had to run. Brown played mostly in the midfield during the TAC Cup Girls season but floated back to defence during the AFL Women’s Under 18 Championships, where she was still able to make an impact with her strong hands and precise kicking. She has already had a taste at a high level, playing VFLW with the Southern Saints in the TAC Cup Girls off-season.

Eastern Ranges lead the way in TAC Cup Girls Team of the Year

THE TAC Cup Girls Team of the Year has been announced, with the Eastern Ranges getting the most spots in the team. Defender, Georgia Macpherson, midfielders, Emerson Woods and Mikala Cann, ruck, Sarah Kendall and forward, Laura McClelland were the Ranges who made the side.

Premiership side, Geelong Falcons were next best with four nominees, headlined by premiership captain, Lucy McEvoy. She was joined by Falcons Best and Fairest, Olivia Purcell, AFL Women’s Under 18 Championships joint Most Valuable Player (MVP), Nina Morrison and Grand Final Player of the Match, Denby Taylor. The players were joined by coach, Jason Armistead, as the premiership coach capped off his wonderful year by being named the TAC Cup Girls Coach of the Year.   

The Greater Western Victoria (GWV) Rebels and Sandringham Dragons also fared well with three members each in the TAC Cup Girls Team of the Year. All Australians, Eleanor Brown (Sandringham) and Sophie Van De Huevel (GWV) headline the team for their TAC Cup Girls sides.

The Calder Cannons, Northern Knights and Dandenong Stingrays were the next best in line with two players from each team making the side. Cannons captain, Madison Prespakis was named in the middle while fellow captain, Jordyn Allen slotted into the back line. Georgia Patrikios joined teammate, Prespakis after a stellar year while Lucy Cripps lined up with Allen in the back line.

Knights duo, Gabrielle Newton and Madeline Brancatisano were both named in the forward line after leading their side to a Grand Final.

Oakleigh’s sole member is All Australian forward, Daisy Bateman while Rebecca Webster leads the way for the Bushrangers. Gippsland co-captain, Tyla Hanks was the only Power nominee and slotted into the star-studded midfield.

No Western Jets or Bendigo Pioneers players made the TAC Cup Girls Team of the Year.

Victoria claims 16-point win over All Stars in AFLW Under 18 State of Origin

VICTORIA has emerged triumphant from a low-scoring thriller against the All Stars in an AFL Women’s Under 18 State of Origin exhibition match. The top players from Vic Metro and Vic Country combined to form Victoria, while those who had stood out from the rest of the nation donned the All Stars jumpers in a clash at Adelaide Oval last night.

Victoria led all game, booting the opening goal of the match and then extending its lead to by 12 points at the main break. Much like the first term, both sides had one scoring shot, but Victoria’s was a major compared to the All Stars’ behind. The All Stars had the best chance to clinch a come-from-behind victory in the final term with four scoring shots, while Victoria had the two. When McKenzie Dowrick, who had been one of the most prominent All Stars players all game, nailed a major at the five and a half minute mark, her side drew within 11 points. Alexia Hamilton and Jaimi Tabb both had a couple of chances in the final term but registered behinds to reduce the deficit to nine points with a few minutes to play. A Nina Morrison goal in the dying minutes put the game to rest and guaranteed a Victorian win.

The Victorian onball brigade proved too strong in the midfield despite Tyla Hanks sitting out the match and the strong Alyce Parker also missing from the action. Kitara Farrar and Denby Taylor were the other two talents who sat out on the night from the original 24-player squads that were named. Victoria dominated the clearances despite a clear advantage in the ruck to Lauren Bella, who amassed 25 hitouts to Rene Caris‘ 12, however Caris won the points around the ground with a midfielder-like effort of 13 disposals and three tackles, displaying the two different types of ruck talent in action

Madison Prespakis starred on the night, racking up game-high disposals (21) and clearances (five), while also laying three tackles and having four inside 50s and two rebounds. Fellow AFL Women’s Under 18 Most Valuable Player (MVP), Nina Morrison was equally as effective, racking up 19 disposals, three marks, four clearances, five inside 50s, three tackles, two rebounds and that final quarter goal. Mikala Cann was again ferocious with a massive 14 tackles – six more than any other player on the field – to go with her 15 touches, two marks, two clearances and two inside 50s. Olivia Purcell (17 disposals, seven tackles and four clearances) and Katie Lynch (15 disposals, two rebounds and one goal) were impressive, while Abbie McKay worked hard with three clearances and three inside 50s from 11 disposals and four tackles. Sophie Van De Heuvel had nine touches and laid five tackles, while the standout bottom-ager was Calder Cannons’ Georgia Patrikios who shone with 17 disposals, three clearances, two inside 50s and two rebounds. Exciting forward, Daisy Bateman was the only multiple goal kicker on the ground, finishing with two majors from five disposals, two marks and two tackles.

For the All Stars, Dowrick was the top ball winner, amassing 18 disposals along with three marks, three clearances, three tackles, one goal and a team-high four rebounds. Her West Australian teammates were also prominent across the ground, with Matilda Sergeant (15 disposals and three marks), Mikayla Bowen (13 disposals, six tackles and two inside 50s) and Sabreena Duffy (12 disposals and two rebounds) among the All Stars’ best. Kate Bartlett also booted a goal from eight disposals, five marks and three tackles, while bottom-age prospects, Queenslander Lily Postlethwaite and Tasmanian, Mia King were also very impressive. Postlethwaite finished with 12 disposals, two marks, six tackles, and equal team-high three clearances, and three inside 50s, while King had 10 disposals, two clearances and laid six tackles as well.

VICTORIA 1.0 | 3.2 | 4.3 | 5.4 (34)
ALL STARS 0.1 | 1.2 | 1.3 | 2.6 (18)

GOALS:

Victoria: Daisy Bateman 2, Nina Morrison, Mikala Cann, Katie Lynch.
All Stars: McKenzie Dowrick, Kate Bartlett.

BEST:

Victoria: Madison Prespakis, Nina Morrison, Georgia Patrikios, Mikala Cann, Olivia Purcell, Sophie Van De Heuvel.
All Stars: McKenzie Dowrick, Mikayla Bowen, Matilda Sergeant, Lily Postlethwaite, Mia King, Kate Bartlett.

AFL Women’s Under 18 All Australian Team announced

MORE than one third of the 2018 AFL Women’s Under 18 All Australian side is still more than 12 months away from being drafted onto and AFL Women’s list. The 22-player team was announced at the conclusion of the State of Origin match last night, with Victoria making up more than half of the team, while Queensland’s unbelievable talent was rewarded with the most of any non-Victorian state.

Queensland’s six was one more than Vic Metro, while Vic Country had the most of any state side with seven All Australians. Western Australia (two), NSW-ACT (one) and South Australia (one) made up the remaining four places in the side. Of the All Australian side, defenders Lucy Cripps and Serene Watson, forwards Gabrielle Newton, Belle Dawes, Lucy McEvoy, Montana McKinnon, and midfielders Georgia Patrikios and Lily Postlethwaite are all bottom-agers and not eligible to be drafted until next year.

The midfield is star-studded with AFL Women’s Under 18 Championships’ Most Valuable Players (MVPs) Madison Prespakis, Nina Morrison and Alyce Parker making the side, while Western Australia’s Sabreena Duffy made the team alongside the versatile McKenzie Dowrick. South Australia’s MVP, McKinnon was named in the forward pocket and would no doubt share the ruck load with Queensland’s Lauren Bella. Natalie Grider (Queensland MVP) was named in the back pocket after a really consistent season, joined in the side by state teammate Jacqueline Yorston.

Others who made the side include AFL Women’s Academy members Jordyn Allen, Sophie Van De Heuvel, Tyla Hanks and Olivia Purcell. Daisy Bateman and Eleanor Brown are the other two players who have impressed not only at TAC Cup Girls level, but at Victorian Football League (VFL) Women’s level as well for their respective sides, Collingwood and Southern Saints.

AFL Women’s Under 18 State of Origin sides announced

VICTORIA’S top junior female footballers will take on the best young stars from around the country in the AFL Women’s Under-18 State of Origin match at Adelaide Oval tomorrow night. The 24-player Victorian team contains 12 Metro and 12 Country players, including five bottom-agers who are predicted to be crucial players for their respective teams in 2019. The All Stars side is even younger, with one third of the players not eligible to be drafted until next year.

Queensland has a remarkable talent base, with 10 players named in the 24-player squad, while Western Australia is the next highest represented in the All Stars side with six. New South Wales/Australian Capital Territory (NSW-ACT) and South Australia have three representatives each, while Tasmania and Northern Territory have one player each in the final side.

Gates open at Adelaide Oval at 5.15pm, with the first bounce at 5.25pm. The game is a curtain raiser to the EJ Whitten Legends Game.

Victoria:

#1 Georgia Patrikios (Calder Cannons)***
#2 Emerson Woods (Eastern Ranges)
#3 Nina Morrison (Geelong Falcons)
#4 Sophie Van De Heuvel (GWV Rebels)
#5 Olivia Purcell (Geelong Falcons)
#6 Daisy Bateman (Oakleigh Chargers)
#7 Madison Prespakis (Calder Cannons)
#8 Eleanor Brown (Sandringham Dragons)
#9 Abbie McKay (Sandringham Dragons)
#10 Isabella Grant (Western Jets)***
#11 Jordyn Allen (Dandenong Stingrays)
#12 Courtney Jones (Dandenong Stingrys)
#13 Bec Webster (Murray Bushrangers)
#14 Georgia Clarke (GWV Rebels)
#15 Lucy McEvoy (Geelong Falcons)***
#16 Gabby Newton (Northern Knights)***
#17 Katie Lynch (Oakleigh Chargers)
#18 Hannah McLaren (Oakleigh Chrgers)
#19 Georgia Macpherson (Eastern Ranges)
#20 Mikala Cann (Eastern Ranges)
#21 Lucinda Cripps (Dandenong Stingrays)***
#22 Rene Caris (GWV Rebels)
#23 Tyla Hanks (Gippsland Power)
#24 Denby Taylor (Geelong Falcons)

All Stars:

#1 Mia King (Tasmania)***
#2 Mikayla Bowen (Western Australia)
#3 Janet Baird (Northern Territory)
#4 Alyce Parker (NSW-ACT)
#5 Lily Postlethwaite (Queensland)***
#6 Belle Dawes (Queensland)***
#7 Rikkiesha Carling (Western Australia)
#8 Tori Groves-Little (Queensland)
#9 Dee Heslop (Queensland)***
#10 Natalie Grider (Queensland)
#11 Nikki Gore (South Australia)
#12 Sabreena Duffy (Western Australia)
#13 Kitara Farrar (Queensland)***
#14 Katelyn Rosenzweig (South Australia)
#15 Alexia Hamilton (NSW-ACT)
#16 Charlotte Hammans (Queensland)***
#17 Serene Watson (Queensland)***
#18 Jacqueline Yorston (Queensland)
#19 McKenzie Dowrick (Western Australia)
#20 Matilda Sergeant (Western Australia)
#21 Kate Bartlett (Western Australia)
#22 Montana McKinnon (South Adelaide)***
#23 Lauren Bella (Queensland)
#24 Brianna McFarlane (NSW-ACT)

*** bottom-ager

 

AFLW Under 18 Championships reviews: Vic Metro

TWELVE All Australian nominees and only one loss throughout the tournament means Vic Metro gets a big tick in the AFL Women’s Under 18 Championships. Their one loss came unexpectedly, going down to Queensland for the first time ever, but they certainly didn’t lose any admirers after that effort.

 

Key players:

Madison Prespakis

The winner of the Vic Metro Most Valuable Player (MVP) and Overall MVP, Prespakis had a tournament to remember. Making an impact in the midfield and in the forward line, Prespakis did not seem to miss a beat for Metro, being one of their most important players throughout the tournament. At her damaging best, she was unstoppable with her penetrating kicks, aggressive tackling and strong hands.

Katie Lynch

Lynch had a huge impact on the Vic Metro line-up, winning the contested ball and executing long, clearing kicks. Her strong hands were also an asset of her game and held her in good stead throughout the tournament, giving her opportunities to move the ball forward with ease. Although we didn’t see much of her in the TAC Cup Girls competition, Lynch showed us what she’s made of during the Championships with relentless pressure and swift ball movement, making the All Australian side.

Gabby Newton

Newton picked up where she left off in the TAC Cup Girls competition, proving why she won the Northern Knights Best and Fairest. Newton racked up a heap of the ball in the midfield across the tournament with her constant hunger to win the footy. She also took some strong grabs and used her clean hands to effect. Newton found herself amongst the goals as well, kicking four goals from four games.

Daisy Bateman

Bateman is a player who just knows how to find the goals. She was Metro’s leading goal kicker of the tournament, with five goals from four games. For a player who is not overly tall, Bateman always managed to position herself well against bigger bodies and when she couldn’t, she was able to sneak out the back of the pack and sneak a goal in. She was a clever footballer who didn’t miss a beat in this tournament, being a dangerous force up forward.

Georgia Patrikios

Patrikios is one of the most exciting footballers to watch, as her agility and clever ball use allows her to create plenty of scoring opportunities for her side. When she found space, she used it well, electing to run and carry and keep the play going, which helped Metro pile on the goals throughout the carnival. Patrikios is a player who can make an impact in any area of the ground and she proved that during the Championships with her swift ball movement.

Eleanor Brown

Another player who knows how to find the footy, Brown managed to rack up plenty of possessions throughout the tournament and make an impact with them. Her strong and clean hands were an asset of her game as they allowed her to create forward thrusts for her side. A deserving All Australian, Brown worked hard to win the footy at all times which proved invaluable for Metro due to her ability to use the ball so well both by hand and by foot.

Mikala Cann

Even though she missed one game during the tournament, Cann still managed to make the All Australian side thanks to her ability to display elite ball use in the middle of the ground. She was a key player on the inside for Metro as her quick hands would allow her side to clear the congestion and go forward. She was creative with the ball in hand, using a variety of kicks and handballs to hit up a target.

Emerson Woods

Woods was able to create ample opportunities when she got the ball in hand, thanks to her long and clever kicks. She had a high work rate throughout the tournament, popping up in many areas of the ground and using the well when she got it. Her strong and clean hands allowed her to control the play for Metro and create scoring opportunities.

Georgia Macpherson

As usual, Macpherson was a solid rock in defence. Her intercept and uncontested marking were truly spectacular as she always positioned herself well in the back half. This allowed her to prevent the other teams from scoring, which was a big reason why Metro only dropped one game during the carnival.

Isabella Grant

Grant displayed a high work rate throughout the tournament with her strong hands and wonderful agility. She was able to side-step opponents with ease and managed to kick the ball long out of congestion to get her side out of trouble. She was a valuable asset in the Vic Metro line-up and deserved her place in the All Australian side as she kept improving as the tournament went along.

 

RESULTS:

Monday July 9

VIC METRO: 3.2 | 5.2 | 7.5 | 7.9 (51)
WESTERN AUSTRALIA: 1.1 | 4.4 | 4.5 | 6.7 (43)

GOALS
Vic Metro: Daisy Bateman 2,Gabby Newton 2, Georgia Macpherson, Britney Gutknecht, Cleo Saxon-Jones.
Western Australia: Kate Bartlett 2, Mikayla Hyde, Taneisha Anderson, Sabreena Duffy, Roxanne Roux.

BESTS
Vic Metro: Mikala Cann, Gabby Newton, Madison Prespakis, Abbie McKay, Katie Lynch, Georgia Patrikios
Western Australia: McKenzie Dowrick, Kate Bartlett, Matilda Sergeant, Rikkiesha Carling, Mikayla Bowen, Roxanne Roux

 

Wednesday, July 11

QUEENSLAND 0.0 | 2.0 | 2.2 | 4.3 (27)
VIC METRO 0.1 | 1.1 | 1.1 | 3.1 (19)

GOALS:
Queensland: Zimmorlei Farquharson 2, Charlotte Hammans, Isabel Dawes.
Vic Metro: Gabby De Angelis, Holly Bate, Madison Prespakis.

ADC BEST:
Queensland: Lily Postlethwaite, Zimmorlei Farquharson, Isabel Dawes, Tori Groves-Little, Charlotte Hammans, Natalie Grider
Vic Metro: Eleanor Brown, Gabby Newton, Madison Prespakis, Katie Lynch, Georgia Macpherson, Georgia Patrikios

 

Friday, July 13

VIC METRO: 3.1 | 5.2 | 9.5 | 10.6 (66)
CENTRAL ALLIES 1.0 | 1.0 | 1.2 | 3.3 (21)

GOALS:
Vic Metro: Gabby Newton 2, Daisy Bateman 2, Britney Gutknecht 2, Cleo Saxon-Jones, Holly Bate, Madison Prespakis, Georgia Patrikios.
Central Allies: Danielle Ponter, Katelyn Rosenzweig, Rachelle Martin.

ADC BEST:
Vic Metro: Madison Prespakis, Georgia Patrikios, Daisy Bateman, Katie Lynch, Sarah Kendall, Eleanor Brown
Central Allies: Hannah Munyard, Montana McKinnon, Madeline Gault, Nikki Gore, Amber Ward, Madison Bennett

2018 AFLW Under 18 All-Australian squad named

VIC Metro and Vic Country players have combined to make up 24 of the 48 players in the coveted All Australian side. In terms of the TAC Cup Girls sides, the Dandenong Stingrays, Oakleigh Chargers, Greater Western Victoria Rebels, Geelong Falcons and Eastern Ranges each have three representatives in the side, while the Cannons have two.

Queensland is the next best in line with 10 players in the side, thanks to a convincing tournament in which it defeated Vic Metro for the first time ever. AFLW Academy members, Lily Postlethwaite, Tori Groves-Little, Lauren Bella, Isabel Dawes and Dee Heslop headline the side.

Western Australia has six representatives in the squad, which includes captain and AFLW Academy member, Sabreena Duffy. She is joined in the side by fellow Academy members, McKenzie Dowrick and Mikayla Bowen.

For NSW/ ACT, Alyce Parker slotted into the team after a dominant tournament and was joined by two other representatives from her state.

South Australia also notched up three representatives with NT Thunder player, Nikki Gore joined by forward, Katelyn Rosenzweig and marking machine, Montana McKinnon.

Tasmania and the Northern Territory have one representative each. Mia King had a solid tournament both in the Tasmanian and Eastern Allies outfit while Janet Baird showcased her skills in the Northern Territory and Central Allies jumper, backing up her solid form in the Victorian Football League (VFL) Women’s competition.

The side will be split into two on August 31 when they take to the stage to play a curtain-raiser to the EJ Whitten Legends game. From there, the 48-player side will be split in half to determine a final 22-player All Australian team.

 

AFLW U18 ALL AUSTRALIAN SQUAD

NSW/ACT: Brianna McFarlane, Alexia Hamilton, Alyce Parker

NORTHERN TERRITORY: Janet Baird

QUEENSLAND: Lauren Bella, Isabel Dawes, Kitara Farrar, Natalie Grider, Tori Groves-Little, Charlotte Hammans, Dee Heslop, Lily Postlethwaite, Serene Watson, Jacqueline Yorston

SOUTH AUSTRALIA: Nikki Gore, Montana McKinnon, Katelyn Rosenzweig

TASMANIA: Mia King

VIC COUNTRY: Jordyn Allen, Rene Caris, Georgia Clarke, Lucinda Cripps, Tyla Hanks, Courtney Jones, Lucy McEvoy, Nina Morrison, Olivia Purcell, Denby Taylor, Sophie Van De Heuvel, Rebecca Webster

VIC METRO: Daisy Bateman, Eleanor Brown, Mikala Cann, Isabella Grant, Katie Lynch, Hannah McLaren, Abbie McKay, Georgia Macpherson, Gabby Newton, Georgia Patrikios, Madison Prespakis, Emerson Woods

WESTERN AUSTRALIA: Kate Bartlett, Mikayla Bowen, McKenzie Dowrick, Sabreena Duffy, Rikki Ryan-Carling, Matilda Sergeant